Are you from foreign countries - Page 2 - China Car Forums
chinese cars - china car forums, chery, geely CCF - The Chinese Car Community China Car Forums - Zhonghua Junjie
Home :: Forums  :: Manufacturers :: Articles :: About Us :: Vendors :: Analysis Reports

Go Back   China Car Forums > Misc > Off-topic

ChinaCarForums.com is the premier Chinese Car Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-25-2006, 09:58 AM   #11
edge
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 280
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by I_Hate_China
I dont see anyone from china, i guess they want to get rid of their cars, trying to put them abroad...well we arent taking htem in US

There are a couple members from China. But most are outside of China. Why? Because this is an English forum, and most Chinese do not speak English. I know you never considered that there are countries in this world that do not use English as the regular mode of communication, but there are.

For ultra-nationalists like you who are desperately xenophobic, the facts are on the line. The US is the one who promotes globalism, so its car industry needs to make good products to survive. No bashing of Japanese, Korean or now, Chinese cars, will make the industry thrive.
edge is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-26-2006, 06:41 PM   #12
fm.illuminatus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: People's Republik of California
Posts: 111
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by edge
Well, I can assure you that China has changed TREMENDOUSLY. I'm not just talking about since the 1950's, I'm talking about even since 2000.

China is a rapidly changing and dynamic country. In fact, it is the most exciting country to be in right now. Also, as for human rights. Yes, there is no doubt China has room for improvement, but on the other hand, the Western media does really skew and misrepresent the situation. Human rights in China is steadily improving and has experienced a lot of improvement in recent years.

China is a lot more sophisticated than a lot of Westerners think. That's why many Americans are often shocked by how modern it is when they go there. I think the Chinese auto industry will definitely be successful one day. It may not be at the level of the world's best right now, but it will catch up faster than the length of time it took Japan or Korea. China is a huge country with tremendous resources.
I'm glad to hear that. I think just to compete on a global market, the chinese government probably has to bring itself up to date with the rest of the world in many ways, human rights being one of them. You can't have thriving businesses in a climate of political repression. Also, this is just a guess, but I think the addition of Hong Kong back in to the control of mainland china probably had a widespread impact on the country in general. After all, hong kong under british rule for all intents and purposes was a free society and I'm sure it's citizens expected the same kind of treatment from the chinese government. The relaxed governing style in hong kong has (again I'm guessing here) probably spread in many ways around the country, making for a more open and modern society.
fm.illuminatus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 06:45 PM   #13
fm.illuminatus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: People's Republik of California
Posts: 111
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AXLE
I was born in America, my parents and family are originally from Russia and I now live in Australia as of 2001. I know how to speak fluent Russian but I cant read Russian
I'm nearly the same way with chinese, I can speak it, (although I can probably only understand at about an 8th grade level and speak on about a 3rd or 4th grade level ... but without a western accent) but I can't read or write it. The only chinese i can write is my name and that's about it.

Last edited by fm.illuminatus; 03-26-2006 at 06:48 PM.
fm.illuminatus is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 03-26-2006, 07:23 PM   #14
edge
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 280
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fm.illuminatus
I'm glad to hear that. I think just to compete on a global market, the chinese government probably has to bring itself up to date with the rest of the world in many ways, human rights being one of them. You can't have thriving businesses in a climate of political repression. Also, this is just a guess, but I think the addition of Hong Kong back in to the control of mainland china probably had a widespread impact on the country in general. After all, hong kong under british rule for all intents and purposes was a free society and I'm sure it's citizens expected the same kind of treatment from the chinese government. The relaxed governing style in hong kong has (again I'm guessing here) probably spread in many ways around the country, making for a more open and modern society.

Well, I think HK's impact has been minimal. The truth is that you cannot seperate economic modernization from political and social modernization. If China had not opened its doors to economic reform, than most people would have remain dependent on the party for information. Now that China's economic is rapidly modernizing, Chinese people have an unprecedented amount of personal freedoms. In the past, the party controlled where a person was to live, to work to travel and even who they could marry. Today, Chinese people have nearly every personal freedom that an American has. Notice I said PERSONAL freedom not political freedom, they are not the same thing. However, even with political freedom, there is much less repression today than there was before. Although if you advocated overthrowing the government in a public arena, you would likely be arrested, otherwise, there are many people who criticize the government nowadays publicly and do not get into trouble. Though there are still some cases of media silencing, however, even there, the repression is not the same as before. While in the past, repression meant death or torture. Today, the tactics are less repressive and may mean having your paper shut down or being demoted (if working for a govt agency).

Of course, there is no doubt that there is still a lot of improvement. But to be fair, it took Western countries many decades of development to get where they were at now. What I'm saying is that things do not happen overnight, but I think signs in China are very encouraging. The major problems however still remain rural poverty, corruption and gaps between the rich and poor. I think China's current central government is VERY competent, however, many local governments, especially in rural areas are very corrupt. The problem is how to make sure the local governments listen to the central government. They will soon find out that the system needs to be reformed, there is no other way to take on such huge problems.
edge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 03:16 AM   #15
fm.illuminatus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: People's Republik of California
Posts: 111
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by edge
Well, I think HK's impact has been minimal. The truth is that you cannot seperate economic modernization from political and social modernization. If China had not opened its doors to economic reform, than most people would have remain dependent on the party for information. Now that China's economic is rapidly modernizing, Chinese people have an unprecedented amount of personal freedoms. In the past, the party controlled where a person was to live, to work to travel and even who they could marry. Today, Chinese people have nearly every personal freedom that an American has. Notice I said PERSONAL freedom not political freedom, they are not the same thing. However, even with political freedom, there is much less repression today than there was before. Although if you advocated overthrowing the government in a public arena, you would likely be arrested, otherwise, there are many people who criticize the government nowadays publicly and do not get into trouble. Though there are still some cases of media silencing, however, even there, the repression is not the same as before. While in the past, repression meant death or torture. Today, the tactics are less repressive and may mean having your paper shut down or being demoted (if working for a govt agency).

Of course, there is no doubt that there is still a lot of improvement. But to be fair, it took Western countries many decades of development to get where they were at now. What I'm saying is that things do not happen overnight, but I think signs in China are very encouraging. The major problems however still remain rural poverty, corruption and gaps between the rich and poor. I think China's current central government is VERY competent, however, many local governments, especially in rural areas are very corrupt. The problem is how to make sure the local governments listen to the central government. They will soon find out that the system needs to be reformed, there is no other way to take on such huge problems.
I can agree with this. I think if the current government can manage to deal with political and religious freedom issues more openly and perhaps reform in that aspect, there may be no need for the current system of government to change. A slow march to freedom can avert a lot of bloodshed and may be the best course for china.
fm.illuminatus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2006, 02:55 PM   #16
Vladimir-S
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 68
Default

I'm from Russia. And my father is an owner of Great Wall puckup 4x4.
Vladimir-S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2006, 01:33 PM   #17
BringIt
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 507
Default

I'm a Chinese-American. Born in Taiwan, grew up in Southern California and still live here today.

Amazingly I can read Chinese, both traditional and simplified, but I can't write worth a darn - lack of practice I guess.

I've traveled quite a bit in China; tons of fun. Going to China again in the summer.

Yes, China has change so much recently, all for the better. I hope China continues down this path and in a few decades, become a 1st world country, prosperous and free.
BringIt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 09:37 AM   #18
BuDDaH
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 9
Default

Ni Hao, Sorry, can't type signs.

I'm from Russia and I do admire China! It's a great country, the future global leader. I'm sure, it'll be so. It also seriously frightens me and many people here in Russia. When growing stronger politically and economically China will expand to the North and swollow Siberia, the two thirds of Russia estraordinally rich in mineral resourses. Maybe Russia will cease to exist as a united state. I'm very pessimistic about future of Russia and don't see any reasons why this shoul not happen. Though surprises may happen. "Russia" is "the country of surprises" in chinese.

I work as a journalist, can speak, read, write and understand in English, German and Russian, of course. I study chinese to get prepared to the chinese, who are coming.

Last edited by BuDDaH; 04-14-2006 at 09:39 AM.
BuDDaH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 05:53 PM   #19
panasianbiz
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 14
Default I am in the US

I live in the US and I am anxious to see what other countries others are from and to know why they are interested in Chinese cas, too.
panasianbiz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2006, 08:37 AM   #20
BringIt
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 507
Default

Haha, no need to worry about the rise of China. Historically China has always stressed harmony and peace; it's part of the culture. Russia stand to benefit greatly from China's rise. Being a close neighbor and friend, and the vast natural resources that China need for growth, Russia will rise in step with China. Believe me that.
BringIt is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

                    
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:04 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.