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Is it a modified version of the Volkswagen Jetta-Vento 2018? Or it's a different car?
https://autoblog.com.ar/2018/01/15/nuevo-vw-vento-fotos-y-video-desde-el-salon-de-detroit/
The new Bora (VW331/5CN) and Lavida Plus (VW331/4CS) both utilize the MQB-A1 platform that also underpins the new Jetta "A7" (VW371). Since the MQB matrix is modular and highly flexible, we might expect differences between the Jetta A7 and the Chinese twins at the chassis level, but the Chinese twins underneath should be largely identical. Of course, the Jetta A7, Lavida Plus and new Bora are different cars and the external differences are obvious (like sisters in a family with mostly similar genes).

As you are probably aware, this platform (MQB A1) also supports other cars such as the Golf (VW370), Golf Sportsvan (VW379), Lamando (VW373/8CS) as well as corresponding models from SEAT, Skoda and Audi.

Comparison of dimensions:
VW371 Jetta A7: 4702/1799/1459 mm
VW331/5 Bora: 4663/1815/1473 mm
VW331/4 Lavida Plus: 4670/1806/1474 mm

Notably, the wheelbase of the VW331 Bora and Lavida Plus (identical at 2688 mm) very closely matches that of the Jetta A7 (2686 mm).
 

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Comparison of dimensions:
VW371 Jetta A7: 4702/1799/1459 mm
VW331/5 Bora: 4663/1815/1473 mm
VW331/4 Lavida Plus: 4670/1806/1474 mm

Notably, the wheelbase of the VW331 Bora and Lavida Plus (identical at 2688 mm) very closely matches that of the Jetta A7 (2686 mm).
dmitra - out of the three I like the Bora the best due to its more teutonic design :thumb:

Australia will not see any sedans sold here below the Passat (EU), as the Jetta family was cut back due to low sales in RHD markets (due to the rise of the SUV).

I wonder is Jetta A7 VW371 aka Sagitar will have Multi-link rear suspension for Chinese consumption? if not why is VW over cannibalizing the Chinese consumers? Does each badge of its own prestige in China?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
dmitra -

I wonder if Jetta A7 VW371 aka Sagitar will have Multi-link rear suspension for Chinese consumption? if not why is VW over cannibalizing the Chinese consumers? Does each badge have its own prestige in China?
Yes, like the outgoing model, probably it will. Recall all the bad press and bad publicity VW attracted with the 2012- and 2013-year Sagitars which were equipped with a (rear) longitudinal arm, torsion beam-type semi-independent setup, which they had to abandon in 2014.

The new Lavida has a torsion beam-type independent suspension ("扭力梁式非独立悬架") as described in its specifications, which is no doubt simpler and cheaper than multi-link, and I believe the new Bora will have this too.

Sagitar definitely has had greater cachet in the Chinese market as it is seen as more of an international or "German" product compared to its "poor cousins" Bora and Lavida, which were obviously "made for China". The current Sagitar (PQ35-based VW361) was also a generation ahead of the outgoing Bora/Lavida (PQ34-based VW311→VW321), so an additional premium was attached to this model. With the newer generation Bora/Lavida, the technical differences with the new Sagitar will be narrower, but the Sagitar will still command a premium by way of higher-spec engines and other in-car features. The related but slightly more expensive Lamando, not really perceived as "made for China" due to its sporty appeal, might be seen as "holding the fort" for the new Sagitar till its future release.

I think VW (or any market-leading manufacturer in an emerging market) does not see the abundance of models as one product cannibalizing another; it is more an attitude like "as long as a customer who enters my showroom leaves with my product, I am happy" and there should at all times be something in that showroom to satisfy that customer. You will find this "fill a segment with as many models possible" policy also being pursued by the likes of GM in China, Suzuki in India, or VW in Brazil.

Work on producing the VW371 has already begun (link). The previous Lavida (VW321/8CS) will likely remain in production for a while alongside the new one; the Gran Lavida will be replaced with the new one (VW330/4CS), but the C-Trek being a relatively new product I should expect to continue.
 

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Yes, like the outgoing model, probably it will...

Sagitar definitely has had greater cachet in the Chinese market as it is seen as more of an international or "German" product compared to its "poor cousins" Bora and Lavida, which were obviously "made for China". The current Sagitar (PQ35-based VW361) was also a generation ahead of the outgoing Bora/Lavida (PQ34-based VW311→VW321), so an additional premium was attached to this model. With the newer generation Bora/Lavida, the technical differences with the new Sagitar will be narrower, but the Sagitar will still command a premium by way of higher-spec engines and other in-car features. The related but slightly more expensive Lamando, not really perceived as "made for China" due to its sporty appeal, might be seen as "holding the fort" for the new Sagitar till its future release.

I think VW (or any market-leading manufacturer in an emerging market) does not see the abundance of models as one product cannibalizing another; it is more an attitude like "as long as a customer who enters my showroom leaves with my product, I am happy" and there should at all times be something in that showroom to satisfy that customer. You will find this "fill a segment with as many models possible" policy also being pursued by the likes of GM in China, Suzuki in India, or VW in Brazil...
I think VW is the GM of China in that respect :) not sure if this is a good or bad thing for the long term.

BTW you have a knowledge of information - do you work in the industry?
 

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BTW you have a knowledge of information - do you work in the industry?
Well, no, I don't work in the industry, but I have been reading about cars/manufacturers or studying the automobile sphere for more than three decades now, i.e. from the mid-'80s (and China for close to 20 years) :) Lately, say for 15 years or so, I have taken a keener interest in the manufacturing/planning aspects of the industry, so you will often find me talking about plants, investments, platforms, production etc.

(Going off-topic for a moment)

I have also had the fortune of associating, over the years, with certain experts in the field (like our dear Erik now) who have been very kind about answering my queries or satisfying my curiosities at various points of time. For instance, in the 2000s, I had made humble contributions to Pal Negyesi's website AutoIndex or GlobalAutoIndex (he used to be a member of this forum long time back).

I have a tenuous personal connection to auto manufacturing in that my dad, in an advisory/supervisory role, was part of the team that worked on the assembly/localization of the Jonga off-road vehicle back in the 1960s (in addition to production of Nissan- and MAN-based military trucks) at the Indian Ordnance Factories in the town of Jabalpur.
 

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Well, no, I don't work in the industry, but I have been reading about cars/manufacturers or studying the automobile sphere for more than three decades now, i.e. from the mid-'80s (and China for close to 20 years) :) Lately, say for 15 years or so, I have taken a keener interest in the manufacturing/planning aspects of the industry, so you will often find me talking about plants, investments, platforms, production etc.

(Going off-topic for a moment)

I have also had the fortune of associating, over the years, with certain experts in the field (like our dear Erik now) who have been very kind about answering my queries or satisfying my curiosities at various points of time. For instance, in the 2000s, I had made humble contributions to Pal Negyesi's website AutoIndex or GlobalAutoIndex (he used to be a member of this forum long time back).

I have a tenuous personal connection to auto manufacturing in that my dad, in an advisory/supervisory role, was part of the team that worked on the assembly/localization of the Jonga off-road vehicle back in the 1960s (in addition to production of Nissan- and MAN-based military trucks) at the Indian Ordnance Factories in the town of Jabalpur.
Cool dmitra :thumb:

I remember Autoindex - I loved that site :)
 
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