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The F3DM is currently marketed at government and corporate buyers in China and sells for about 150,000 yuan.

BYD targets corporate and government buyers because of government subsidies (implemented on a trial basis in 13 Chinese cities including Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen) for hybrid, electric and fuel-cell cars used in public transport, especially taxis and postal and urban sanitary service vehicles.

BYD is in talks with the Shenzhen government on subsidizing taxi drivers using F3DMs. Feedback from taxi drivers will be used to improve the cars before they are marketed to the general public in China.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/bizchina/2009-04/13/content_7670296.htm

So the car is not really official on sale in China but only on sale for government.
 

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Has anyone read a test drive of the F3DM? I've seen the car, and it's not bad looking, fit and finish is better than on the E6 which was next to it in Geneva, but they have no cars available for testing, and no european journalist has ever driven a BYD. So we just have to guess what it's worth...
 

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BYD starts retail sale of its electric-hybrid car F3DM

Chinese carmaker BYD Co kicked off retail sales of its electric-hybrid vehicle Monday, but is banking on the possibility a proposed government subsidy will spark sales of the vehicle in China.

The Warren Buffett-backed company launched the new model, the F3DM, on Monday at its headquarters in Shenzhen.

With a window-sticker price of 169,800 yuan ($24,855), sales may start off slow as car buyers may wait until plans for a government subsidy are finalized in July.

The updated, low-emission version has a solar panel on the roof of the car, which allows it to run on gasoline, electricity and solar energy.

The F3DM has a range of about 60 miles on electric-only power.

BYD introduced its plug-in hybrid to corporate and government-agency customers in December 2008 and supplied around 100 of the vehicles in 2009.

"We hope that the government starts the subsidy policy as soon as possible then we can offer electric cars with attractive prices to Chinese car buyers," said Xu An, BYD's spokesman.

Analysts said that the car's success would depend on government subsidies due to its formidable price. BYD's gas-powered F3 model, which utilizes the same body style as the F3DM, is currently priced at between 59,800 and 89,800 yuan.

If the government does choose to subsidize the cars, retail buyers could enjoy a break of up to 50,000 to 60,000 yuan for each car, Miao Wei, vice-minister of Industry and Information Technology, said earlier this month.

A decision on the subsidy is expected to be formally announced in July.

"As Chinese consumers are very sensitive to pricing, the amount of the subsidy is key to the development of electric cars in China," said Cheng Yuan, an independent auto-industry analyst.

"If the price is too high, there won't be a market for new energy cars."

According to an online survey conducted by Chinese Internet information services portal ifeng.com last week, 68.9 percent of respondents said they will consider buying new energy vehicles and 40.8 percent said that they believed the high price will be the major obstacle to hybrid car development.

China's Chang'an Motor's plans to launch its MINI electric car in the second half of 2010, priced at 150,000 yuan.

General Motors has also said it will bring its Chevrolet Volt electric vehicle to China next year and Nissan also said recently that it will introduce its electric car, the LEAF, to China in 2011. Both of the companies have appealed for government support for electric car development in China.

http://www.autohome.com.cn/news/201003/102987.html



http://img.autohome.com.cn/upload/spec/7417/u_20100330235257472209.jpg


http://img.autohome.com.cn/upload/spec/7417/u_20100330235239331209.jpg


http://img.autohome.com.cn/upload/spec/7417/u_20100330235413753209.jpg


http://img.autohome.com.cn/upload/spec/7417/u_20100330235729565209.jpg


pictures at:
http://car.autohome.com.cn/pic/series-s7417/407.html?pvareaid=100496
 

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BYD making F3 sedan in Russia with local partner

Chinese automaker BYD Co. has started assembling its cars in Russia, the company's local partner TagAZ announced yesterday.

TagAZ said it has completed assembly of its first BYD F3 sedan at its plant in Taganrog, southern Russia. Mass production will begin this summer, with sales in Russia to be handled by the TagAZ dealer network.

The BYD F3 sedan was China's best-selling car in 2009 and the first few months this year. The first F3 model to be produced by TagAZ will be the entry-level version, fitted with a Mitsubishi-sourced 1.5-liter engine and a five-speed manual gearbox.

BYD may build 10,000 cars at TagAZ by the end of the year and replace South Korea's Hyundai Motor as the Russian carmaker's main partner, Bloomberg reported today, citing TagAZ workers. TagAZ makes about 40% of the cars Hyundai sells in Russia.

As Hyundai plans to end its assembly contract with TagAZ and transfer local production to its new plant in Russia, the BYD contract will help TagAZ make up the shortfall caused by the move of Hyundai.

http://autonews.gasgoo.com/auto-news/1015896/byd-making-f3-sedan-in-russia-with-local-partner.html
 

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Here is the first American review of the F3 DM:
http://www.plugincars.com/la-housing-inspector-logs-first-300-miles-byd-plug-hybrid-106717.html




It's not a genuine test drive, but at least, we're getting some impression on the F3 DM.
The 50 miles (80km) autonomy is quite impressive. EV Manufacturer are claiming up to 100 miles (160km) on electric mode, but the truth is that the figure are far lower. I once drove a Prius plug-in. Toyota said it could run 50km on EV mode. But after a 15km drive, the battery was almost empty.
 

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Another review of F3 DM this time by New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/20/automobiles/autoreviews/byd-f3-dm-review.html?_r=1&pagewanted=2

Conclusion:
To focus on the F3DM’s inconspicuous sheet metal and boring driving experience is to miss the audacity of BYD’s strategy.

Think of the F3DM as a Chevrolet Volt with a Wal-Mart price tag, a car with a large-capacity battery — that delivered 31 miles of uninterrupted pure-electric driving in testing — as well as a gasoline engine that gives it the ability to go an additional 300 miles. But while the Volt has a $41,000 price tag (before state and federal tax incentives), the F3DM — which does have an auxiliary audio input jack and a parking sensor — is expected to sell for less than $29,000. Incentives could drop the price closer to $20,000.
 
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