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Chery may be the ultimate destination for the possibly-to-be-discontinued Smart lineup.

The Hornet is a very ugly vehicle, IMO, and not as nice as a Smart ForFour, which is a really nice little car, though it doesn't offer much besides different styling that you can't get in a Mitsubishi Colt (same thing underneath..).

As for good looking Korean cars, there have been good looking cars from Korea and still are.

Korea, like China, had the misfortune of becoming a serious car-producing nation at a time when most cars look very bland or are very homogenious at best. They also had the misfortune of making cast-off Western or Japanese designs for a long time - like the Kia Pride (old Mazda 121) or Daewoo Nexia (even older Opel Kadett).

Korea also relied too heavily in ItalDesign during their dryest years of bland euroboxes in the mold of the nice but very dull-looking Fiat Uno and Seat Ibiza mk1.

Proto motors, Korea's primo sports car manufacturer, makes a wonderful car called the Spirra, powered by a Ford Mustang DOHC 4.6 V8:





Then of course, there's the new Hyundai Grandeur (sold as the Hyundai Azera in the USA), which looks very good for this type of car, far better than what Buick offers, and the Grandeur uses many traditional Buick cues.



Kia's Rio5 and Hyundai's Tiburon are good looking cars, and surprisingly the original SsangYong Musso wasn't bad either - I always hated them in pictures until I saw one in the flesh and realized I actually liked it. But an early one, not the later ones with all that plasticky crap on them.

I never took Korean cars seriously until the last 3 years or so - they've really become very good cars, reliable, well-made, and they're starting to develop a personality of their own (early Korean cars had zero flair and even less style and persona).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
An update on Chrysler Hornet.

There are three candiates for Hornet production in China. The leading contender is VW. Chrysler won't name the other two.

Why VW? Probably for the sole reason of IP rights trustability. Give the drawings to VW and Chrysler can be assured VW won't backstab them.

Give the drawings to Chery or some other hungry Chinese company and 20% cheaper clones start hitting the street, with Hornet's design IP recycled in other cars.
 

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back to the car for a moment, I note that in the article it mentions that DC are looking for a company with an existing platform. So it wouldn't have to worry about it's IP getting copied since it is expecting the car manufacturer to have the platform already.

Could be a good idea, if the world shifts to small cheap cars, DC is somewhat lacking, except for smart, which I have heard they are going to stop and is not deemed to have been a success.

And in China, they are very much behind, despite having the oldest car making JV in China (Beijing Jeep).
 

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DaimlerChrysler wants to form tie-up with China's Chery Automobile

Monday, September 25, 2006; Posted: 12:41 PM

FRANKFURT, Sep 25, 2006 (XFN-ASIA via COMTEX) -- DaimlerChrysler AG wants to set up a co-operation
agreement with Chery Automobile whereby the Chinese company will make small
cars that will be sold by Chrysler under the Dodge brand in the US, according
to a prerelease of the weekly Der Spiegel, which did not cite specific
sources.
The newspaper said the project is controversial within DaimlerChrysler,
with opponents questioning whether cars produced in China can meet quality
standards.
It said a tie-up aimed to solve some of Chrysler's problems. About 70 pct
of Chrysler's revenues are generated by sales of large vehicles, such as
pick-ups, SUVs and minivans, but these are declining.
DaimlerChrysler said on Sept 15 that Chrysler's third-quarter operating
loss would be higher than expected and revised downward its 2006 profit
forecast for the entire group.
 

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I'm glad I never encouraged anyone to invest in Visionary Vehicles. I had a feeling that Bricklin's deal would fall through.
 

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Hudson said:
I'm glad I never encouraged anyone to invest in Visionary Vehicles. I had a feeling that Bricklin's deal would fall through.
Why would Bricklin's deal fall through?

Chery could make cars for both DCX and VVCars; why the heck not?
 

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Having done research on this guy for decades, I've never trusted him. And I have to think that Chery doesn't fully trust him either. All of the PR about Chery coming to the US has been from Bricklin's side and very little has been said about him by the people at Chery. It would seem that they're trying to find another route to the US market.
 

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Chery's owners

zachab242 said:
Is Chery Privately held or publicly traded? If public what exchange and sybol? TY
At present neither. Chery is owned mostly by the Anhui Province and Wuhu City governments. According to Xinhua News on September 14th the company is planning to launch its initial public offering (IPO) sometime next year. But even after that it will most likely continue to be owned mostly by the state, much like Brilliance.
 

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Chery to Build Dodge Hornet?

Will the Dodge Hornet be made in China? Automotive News reports today that DaimlerChrysler is in "late-stage negotiations" with China's Chery Motors to build a new small car for export, a car most believe will be one based on the Hornet concept (pictured) DCX showed in Geneva earlier this year. DaimlerChrysler executives are mum on the deal, saying they won't announce a small-car partnership until the end of the year. Still, a Chery-Chrysler partnership also calls to question a longstanding bid by auto entrepreneur Malcolm Bricklin to bring Chery cars to the US under his Visionary Vehicles badge. According to AN, Bricklin says he won't be closed out by a Chery-Chrysler partnership, and that Chery-built Chryslers will help his cause by legitimizing Chery's production capabilities. He also says his joint-venture with Chery will be finalized by year's end. Either way, Chinese cars are coming, possibly sooner than we think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Chery trying to sell Chrysler what it does not have; a US-regulation compliant B-segment hatchback with a J.D. Power & Associates's defect rating of 150 or less.
 

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Chery is just selling them the ability to build a vehicle, of Chrysler's design, at a competitive rate and quality rating.
 

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If the deal gets complete, Is Chery going to sell the car to Chrysler for about $9000 then Chrysler will put a Dodge badge on the car and sell it for around $12000?
 

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Yep.

But it's a win-win for both sides. Chery gets the invaluable experience (and make a small profit, hopefully), and DCX gets a much needed small car and not lose money on each sale (and instead make a small profit, again, hopefully).

Remember all the rebadged Japanese and Korean cars in the US market back in the 80-90's? Same deal here.
 

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Latest news...

HONG KONG, Oct. 3 -- DaimlerChrysler has reached a broad understanding with Chery Automobile of China to set up a joint venture to export cars to the United States for the first time, according to two auto industry managers.

While some details of the joint venture are still being worked out -- no timelines or prices were disclosed -- the two companies have begun negotiating with suppliers of auto parts to the assembly line, these people said on the condition that they not be further identified because confidential negotiations were continuing.

The assembly line, to be in Chery's headquarters city of Wuhu, in Anhui Province in east-central China, will produce a subcompact car slightly smaller and cheaper than the Dodge Neon, which was sold in the United States for about $14,000 until it was discontinued at the end of the 2005 model year.

The timeline depends on how quickly DaimlerChrysler and Chery can set up the assembly line and raise the quality to DaimlerChrysler's standards. Though American companies, including Chrysler, have been making cars through joint ventures in China for years, those cars have been sold domestically only.

Indeed, this venture could start by selling small numbers of cars in China before any significant exports begin to the United States.

The arrival of Chinese-made cars at American ports is likely to upset the United Automobile Workers union, which has been deeply concerned about job losses as Detroit-based manufacturers lose market share to the nonunion American operations of Asian and European companies.

Dieter Zetsche, the chairman of DaimlerChrysler, said at the official opening of a Beijing factory on Sept. 15 that his company was in talks with automakers in China and elsewhere about building small cars for the North American market but that no agreement had been completed.

The spokesman for DaimlerChrysler's operations in China, Trevor Hale, said on Tuesday that Mr. Zetsche's Beijing comments remained the company's position and that he could not elaborate on them.

Chery's offices were closed Tuesday for China's weeklong celebration of the founding of the People's Republic on Oct. 1, 1949, and Chery officials could not be reached for comment.

Rumors of a DaimlerChrysler deal with Chery were flying thick and fast at the Paris auto show last week and have been showing up in the Chinese news media as well.

The selection of Chery represents a setback for DaimlerChrysler's main Chinese partner until now, Beijing Automotive. Daimler and Beijing Automotive have built Jeeps for the Chinese market and are now starting to jointly build Mercedes, Chrysler and Mitsubishi models for sale in China as well.

Yale Zhang, the greater China vehicles forecast director at CSM Worldwide, a big automotive consulting company, said cooperation between DaimlerChrysler and Chery would make sense.

''I think that's a good deal to help Chery improve quality and help Chrysler have a small car,'' he said. With its heavy reliance on sport utility vehicles, minivans and pickup trucks in the American market, Chrysler has been hit hard by high gasoline prices and has been looking for a small car to sell.

Building and exporting a small car from Wuhu to the United States will be a challenging exercise in logistics. The city is on a navigable section of the Yangtze River, about 150 miles west of Shanghai and well downstream from the Three Gorges Dam. Car-carrying vessels tend to have very shallow drafts -- Honda has been able to bring such vessels up the shallow Pearl River to Guangzhou to load hatchbacks for the European market -- but many vessels that commonly carry auto parts have deeper drafts and cannot easily navigate the Pearl or the Yangtze.

The state-owned Chery already has a factory in Wuhu that makes 300,000 cars a year and will complete a separate, similar-size plant across the street from it early next year; it was not immediately clear on Tuesday whether cars bound for the United States would be assembled at the factory nearing completion or at another factory to be built in the vicinity. Chery also has ambitions to sell cars with its own brand in the United States and has a distribution agreement with Malcolm Bricklin, an entrepreneur who has specialized in bringing low-cost cars to the American market.

Mr. Zetsche said in Beijing that the company could not manufacture small cars competitively in North America for the domestic market.
 

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hazik said:
If the deal gets complete, Is Chery going to sell the car to Chrysler for about $9000 then Chrysler will put a Dodge badge on the car and sell it for around $12000?
More like $8,000 or less to sell it in the US for $10,000...or less.
BringIt said:
But it's a win-win for both sides. Chery gets the invaluable experience (and make a small profit, hopefully), and DCX gets a much needed small car and not lose money on each sale (and instead make a small profit, again, hopefully).

Remember all the rebadged Japanese and Korean cars in the US market back in the 80-90's? Same deal here.
Not exactly the "same deal." The rebadged cars of the 1980s and 1990s were exactly that...rebadged. This is the case of a manufacturer designing a car and finding someone to build it for them. This is done in Europe all the time.
 
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