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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I looked thru all the threads in the motorcycles section - I am REALLY surprised that there was no thread for electric bikes/motor scooters - so I'm starting one! Why? Well......several reasons. First, it is 'green' technology, which is significant (more on that in a bit).....and second, it is a GROWING market segment in China. Many cities are outlawing or starting to phase out gas engine motorcyles (Nanning, for example is planning on phasing them out in a few years by not allowing them to have their registration renewed), so the alternative is a electric bike or motor scooter. They now come in all shapes and sizes, and the large 60kw models are FAST - faster off the line than most gas bikes with a top speed of 60-65kph. I just bought one two weeks ago.....traditional styling, room for two people, 60kw electric engine, front disc brake, alarm system built in and two storage areas - a rear carrier box as well as under the seat. It is perfect for where I live in Nanning - I can ride to my school, the nearest Wal Mart is 10 minutes away, and because it's a 60kw model I have increased range as well.........up to 70km between charges if I don't go full speed all the time!!:D I am also embracing green technology and reducing my carbon footprint by cutting down my taxi usage by 70-80%.......and one more thing - IT'S FUN!!! Now, you're probably asking "ok, how much for something like this?" - would you believe 2,700rmb ($395.00 US)?? They are not required to be licensed (yet), and there aren't really a lot of rules about riding them......which needs to change but that's another discussion. Let's get back to green technology......

I think it is absurd that something like this is NOT really available in the USA. Sure, I know that some versions of electric bikes are available there, but nothing like what is available here in China. There are literally THOUSANDS of them on the streets in Nanning, and all across China you'll see the same thing. They are relatively inexpensive, provide a real alternative between the bicycle and the automobile, are quiet (unlike motorbikes which can be downright noisy) and help the environment. They need to be regulated better here as well as creating some sort of "riders training" - but they are still a great example of green technology in use right now in today's world providing a transportation source for MILLIONS of chinese citizens daily. Could these work in the USA????? I don't see why not - license them (for city revenue), require some sort of training for riders and limit them to city streets (say.....streets that are 35mph and under). Students could use them for school commutes, adults could them as a alternative to using the car for the "quick run down to the store for a loaf of bread" type of trips that most EVERYONE does - and if you can eliminate those short trips where is car isn't really necessary, I'll bet you could see a savings of up to 5% in american gas consumption across the board - maybe more? They can be plugged in at home (my apartment complex provides a plug-in area for electric bikes - 20rmb a month for residents), they charge easily overnight and IF you ride them sensibly they are probably safer than gas motorcycles simply because you don't go as fast on them. I'm going to end my lengthy comments here by asking a couple of questions and seeing your comments on this...............first - why aren't they available in the USA (or other countries)? Second - SHOULD they be available in the USA (or other countries)?

Anyway, I hope this will be a worthy addition to the motorcycles section of the forum - looking forward to comments and active discussion!!
 

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jmsteiny-thanks as always for your up close and personal reporting. I think you make many valid points on electric bikes.

First, about the price of only $395.00-wow, that is cheap, and the propulsion energy is still strong enough to get you around. I think that here in the U.S. people would largely poo-poo the idea, because, this is the U.S., we like things big and we like things expensive.

There would be so many people trying to take advantage and over-price the electric bikes. I really like the idea and if they could be had for that price I would consider getting both my wife and I one. We'd have a ball in the SE Arizona hicksticks riding around on those. I am all for it.

But these should be an alternative for those in NY City, Philadelphia, Boston, Miami, Houston, Dallas, Tucson, Phoenix, Portland(Portland, OR, is a progressive west coast city that is already building electrical re-charge stations-that would be a perfect city to bring electric bikes to!), Seattle, etc.

Vancouver, B.C., would be a beautiful city to electric bike in.

I am eagerly looking forward to buying an all-electric car here in Arizona. I am considering first of all a BYD e6. I'll have to wait until 2011 and that is fine, I only have 34,723 miles on my 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS with the 2.0L I4 152hp ICE. The fact that the BYD e6 has a range of 249 gives it the nod for me.

My second choice is a smaller all-electric car, it is called the Pininfarina-Bollore BlueCar. It is made by a collaboration of Bollore of France, they make the lithium polymer battery, and Italy's Pininfarina, yep, the design studio company. The car will only seat four people, has an electronically-limited top speed of 85mph, a range of 153 miles, and charges up in about 5-6 hours.

Both cars have quick-charge systems being built for them, that will greatly enable extra long journeys, if a charging place can be found.

Thing that excites me about the 2011 BYD e6 is its 249 mile range! We can take our 80 mile shopping trips west to Tucson, shop around and/or go to a movie, and hop back in our e6 and have plenty of electrical power to shop around the city some more or drive home, with lots of extra power left over.

An early price estimate on both is about $25,000 USD for the 2010 Pininfarina-Bollore BlueCar and about $28,000 USD for the 2011 BYD e6. Both cars will be eligible for the Obama Administration's $7,500 "green" car rebates on purchases. As far as I know these rebates are available now. And they don't expire artificially soon, either. I really think the green car rebates are a smart idea from the new President here in the U.S.

But the electric bike idea is a good one for the large American cities, I would think the Chinese bikemakers should be scurrying to try and strike some export deals...the idea is a very inviting one to me, and I'm interested in one if they could be bought for a price like that. Wal*Mart would be a place that they could be sold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great comments (as always), Rally Red. I think you're right - unethical dealers WOULD probably try for some price gouging. However.......even if my bike sold for say.......$795.00 US? Think about it - great for commutes of 40 miles round trip (20 there/20 back) or less, short shopping trips, inner city transportation, they plug into a standard household electrical socket, they're durable with not many moving parts to break down (turn signal wiring is the thing that seems to go first but a drier, less humid climate might be beneficial) - for the most part they are extremely easy to maintain. The cheapest gas bikes go for at least, what - $2000.00 US? A small gas motor scooter? $1200-1400.00 US? Even at $795.00 US, a 60kw electric scooter with a top speed of 40mph and a charging distance of 40-50 miles sounds like a pretty good bargain to me. Add up the savings in gasoline by not using the car on short trips or short commutes, and I'll bet that the bike can pay for itself in 2 years, maybe less. There's also variations of this too - what about taxis? We have 3 wheel electric taxis now (2 can sit behind the driver - it's basically a 3 wheel motorcycle, but with a 60kw electric engine) and they are growing in numbers quickly. Think of these in a crowded downtown area - smaller and more nimble than a normal auto taxi and instead of constantly charging them, the taxis here have 2-3 sets of batteries. They just swap out the dead batteries and put in freshly charged ones - it takes 10-15 minutes and is pretty simple. I've seen some families with the 3 wheel versions here too - dad will drive and the family will ride in back!!

I guess what I am REALLY hoping is that there will be a "attitude adjustment" in the USA - hopefully people will start to realize that you DO NOT need your car for transportation needs 100% of the time any more. Also, for people using these bikes for inner city needs, you don't need the biggest electric bike there is. A smaller version of my bike (48kw, no front disc brake, top speed of 25mph with a charging distance of 30 miles) only sells for 2000 rmb ($295.00 US) - that could sell for $550.00 US and be just right for inner city delivery boys, people going from their downtown condo/loft to the office, etc. - what a difference it could make. Rally Red, I hope you WILL get the chance someday to own one - they're a kick to ride!!:thumb:
 

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jmsteiny-well, you have made the idea all the more exciting and interesting from your comments here. I will keep my eyes open while shopping and maybe poke around a bit on the net to see what's available in electric bikes. I know we'll pay more than you there in China, but, like you say, it will still save over automobile propulsion costs. Let's face it, these cars are expensive modes of transportation to maintain and operate.

I love driving my car, but a ride on an electric bike really sounds fun. Thanks for all of your input!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Some pics.............

I took these right after I purchased my bike at the end of March.......and just forgot to post them! I thought people might be interested to see what I got for my 2,700rmb...........storage compartment under the seat, cargo box on the back (with a back rest for the passenger), a front DISC brake, top speed 60-65kph, distance range of 50-70km on one charge. With the current exchange rate 2,700rmb is about $400.00 USD - pretty damn cheap. I never need to use a taxi anymore except for the airport and heavy rain - it's comfortable, it can keep up with traffic just fine, VERY easy to drive and maintain (maintinence? - no gas, no oil, few moving parts - brake adjustment is about the only maintinence I need every so often). To put it simply........I love it, and it's a kick to ride!
 

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Lookin' good, jmsteiny! The bike looks sharp and looks like it will really zip right along with traffic. Bring it to the U.S.-I could just see Costco or Wal*Mart or even some online spot like Amazon.Com selling this bike. Cool!

I'ts perfect for Arizona weather, too. I will look further in to this idea for my wife and I.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Welcome, Usedaudi! Kind of interesting that your first post would be in this thread, but I guess there really isn't a internet forum (at least in english) for electric bikes/motor scooters in China! Do you currently own a electric bike or motor scooter? If you're interested, I'll take a few photos when I'm out and about and just give you a idea of the vast variety of styles and sizes of electric bikes we have here. Mine is about the biggest you can get, there is a LOT more to choose from!! Anyway, welcome to China Car Forums, and don't be shy to add your comments to the community here!:thumb:
 

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Welcome to China Car Forums, usedaudi. BTW-Liam Neeson drives a hot mid-sized late-model grey Audi(possibly an A6...I'm kind of taking a hankerin' to Audi's lately!!) in the movie 'Taken'. I bought the DVD and watched it last night-it's a real action/adventure/James Bond-ish type movie, only I liked it better than my favorite James Bond movie, 'Die Another Day.' Really a fun movie and it's intense.

Anyway, welcome to the car forum on all things Chinese, which, as you know, includes electric bikes. Do ask away, jmsteiny will give you a good answer to your question.
 

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jmsteiny said:
Welcome, Usedaudi! Kind of interesting that your first post would be in this thread, but I guess there really isn't a internet forum (at least in english) for electric bikes/motor scooters in China! Do you currently own a electric bike or motor scooter? If you're interested, I'll take a few photos when I'm out and about and just give you a idea of the vast variety of styles and sizes of electric bikes we have here. Mine is about the biggest you can get, there is a LOT more to choose from!! Anyway, welcome to China Car Forums, and don't be shy to add your comments to the community here!:thumb:
Thanks jmsteiny.:) I dont have, I am planning to buy. But I do use my uncle's electric bike.
 

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Hi Jimsteiny, I popped back in and found there is quite a bit on the two wheeled section nowadays, so I might be able to justify sticking around!

Because I am working on green (low cost compliance to Euro 3) technology for light motorcycles, I am also concerned about the electric bikes - if the gasoline bike is killed, I won't have any market. There are green arguments in favour of both gasoline and electric powered solutions, provided the gasoline bikes have good emissions performance, and depending on how you make your electricity, what kind of batteries you use etc. Also compared to cars, gasoline bikes can represent a big improvement if correctly engineered.

Anyway, to the debate on why the uptake of electric bikes is so huge in China but hasn't made an impact outside of China. I was there when they really ballooned, I think it was in about 2002 ish. I also think it is strange that they haven't made an impact elsewhere.

Possible reasons - certainly in the UK, 2 wheeled transport is less popular than cars. There are quite a lot of keen cyclists who would cite various motives such as environmental, economics etc but a big part of it is that these tend to be fairly sporty people who see the excercise element as a big reason for cycling and so wouldn't want an electric bike.

Of the petrol motorcyclists, obviously the sportsbike people aren't going to see it as an alternative.

Of the car drivers, it's difficult to get them out the car whatever you offer if it isn't another car.

So that only leaves the users of small commuter type motorcycles left, a relatively small group here.

Technical reasons: Chinese people typically weigh about 65kg and western people are on average about 75kg (they say, although I think the number should be higher!). Chinese people live in densely populated cities, so although I don't know the stats, one would assume the average commute is a smaller number of km.

I believe the battery technology used is still lead-acid or Ni-Cad. I understand the battery life may only be a year which significantly affects the economics. If the technology moves on to Lithium then everything gets better except the cost which goes up dramatically.

Economic: I think the electric bikes in China start at about 150 USD-ish? But distribution and retailing costs are low. I know that the Lifan motorcycle that cost us about 900GBP (at the time this was almost 1800 USD) would retail in China at around 500-600 USD. So Jimsteiny's 400 USD -ish electric bike would not be 400 USD overseas, probably more like 1200 if sold in small volumes. If you could get the volume, or be confident you could get the volume, then it should be possible to close that gap, because a lot of the Chinese manufactured product you can buy in the West can be bought at similar prices to Chinese retail.

That's about all I can think of. I still think it's strange, but I never drove an electric bike so can't comment on it. I had admired them from the comfort of my car, but when I inquired about it my colleagues politely pointed out that although all these young office secretaries looked lovely on their shiny electric bikes, it wouldn't work well for the fat bloke who likes to race!

Gav
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
First of all, it is a REAL pleasure to see you again fightingtorque!! I'm humbled that you would find this thread worth your time - welcome back! The electric bike scene has changed a bit since you've been gone.........for better AND worse. First of all, the biggest e-bikes are now 60kw - five 12v batteries instead of 4. My bike is like this - I can top out around 65kph (with fresh batteries) and go around 60-70km in between charges (if I don't drive aggressive).......and my weight (76kg) doesn't even make my bike break a sweat (in fact I've carried 2 people on my bike going up a slight hill....and my bike was still accelerating!!). Now, I am a veteran motorcyclist - I rode a Suzuki 450cc sport tourer all over the western USA for about 5-6 years when I was younger. I ride with protection (3/4 coverage helmet vs. the plastic baseball helmets most people wear here) because 60kph is fast enough to cause GRAVE injuries if you get in a accident - no matter if you are on a gas or e-bike. To ride a e-bike here (in China I mean) requires no special training or licensing.......that needs to change. These bikes are fast enough to kill, and yet I see people riding them all the time in the most dangerous of ways. ALSO, there is a new category in between the e-bike and gas bikes............the sub-50cc gas scooters. THESE things are amazing......49cc engine (which means no licensing required, it's under 50cc), top speed of about 70-75kph, a single gas tank range of about 200km (it's a very small gas tank so the gas mileage is absurdly good) - they are nimble and FAST. It's insane that people can buy these and ride them on the streets without any training!

I can understand totally about e-bikes not being a huge hit in England....as you know in China e-bikes are popular because they are so affordable AND practical. They're also a symbol here for a new level of middle class - people who can't afford a car yet but are beyond bicycles and buses. For me, I see them as a very viable alternative for many people in America that use their cars for those short (1 mile or less) trips to the store for milk and bread - or a GREAT alternative for students in college towns....a great way to support the "think green" concept! There are also 3 wheel electric taxis now.....they could be great in a crowded downtown like Manhattan or central Chicago. However, until there is a real 'attitude adjustment' as far as realizing that you do NOT need your car for every little trip you make, e-bikes will never be more than a novelty at best. I feel liberated in the sense that I do not need to own a car to live comfortably in China - urban life appeals to me a lot! Here's the thing though.............the time is RIPE for e-bikes to be a big hit in America if they are marketed properly. Firghtingtorque, you will probably remember the moped craze in the 1970's (at least in America)......their popularity was a DIRECT of the two arab oil embargos that decade. Let's see..........what's happening right now? Volatile oil prices, a global recession, global warming, green technology and a green lifestyle becoming more and more important to people. Wal Mart could be a natural distributor for e-bikes.....they already have a supply chain line set up with China and they could even set up a e-bike "tune up center" at certain stores for battery replacement/disposal, light bulbs, brake adjustment, etc......additional store income! Require basic licensing for them, limit them to city streets under 35mph and require helmets/protective wear. Do I think that there could be a e-bike in every garage in America? It would be nice, but no - that is unrealistic. However, considering the demographics of where a e-bike is truly practical (urban downtown living, college towns, short shopping trips, etc.), there are still MILLIONS of potential customers out there. Imagine if all these people really woke up and decided to make a difference and limit their dependence on their cars by using a e-bike just PART of the time........that could be worth a couple of percentage points in reduction of oil consumption (in other words, BILLIONS of dollars saved, less pollution and less dependence on foreign oil). It really is a practical and reasonable alternative, and it is a reality that is available NOW if people would just have a bit of a "attitude adjustment".
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thought you all might enjoy this.............I saw this today as a Yahoo front page news story. That is significant - the awareness (finally) of the e-bike as a major, viable transportation source for millions of chinese citizens (and around the world) and the fact that is is newsworthy enough to be a front page article on a major portal like Yahoo. No link - I'm just pasting the story here for you!!

SHANGHAI – It's a simple pleasure, but Xu Beilu savors it daily: gliding past snarled traffic on her motorized bicycle, relaxed and sweat-free alongside the pedal-pushing masses.

China, the world's bicycle kingdom — one for every three inhabitants — is going electric.

Workers weary of crammed public transport or pedaling long distances to jobs are upgrading to battery-powered bikes and scooters. Even some who can afford cars are ditching them for electric two-wheelers to avoid traffic jams and expensive gasoline.

The bicycle was a vivid symbol of China in more doctrinaire communist times, when virtually no one owned a car. Even now, nearly two decades after the country began its great leap into capitalism, it still has 430 million bicycles by government count, outnumbering electric bikes and scooters 7-1.

But production of electric two-wheelers has soared from fewer than 200,000 eight years ago to 22 million last year, mostly for the domestic market. The industry estimates about 65 million are on Chinese roads.

Car sales are also booming but there are still only 24 million for civilian use, because few of the 1.3 billion population can afford them. And unlike in many other developing countries, Chinese cities still have plenty of bicycle lanes, even if some have made way for cars and buses.

"E-bike" riders are on the move in the morning or late at night, in good weather or bad. When it's wet, they are a rainbow army in plastic capes. On fine days, women don gloves, long-sleeved white aprons and face-covering sun guards.

One of them is Xu, on her Yamaha e-bike, making the half-hour commute from her apartment to her job as a marketing manager. She had thought of buying a car but dropped the idea. "It's obvious that driving would be more comfortable, but it's expensive," she says.

"I like riding my e-bike during rush hour, and sometimes enjoy a laugh at the people stuck in taxis. It's so convenient and helpful in Shanghai, since the traffic is worse than ever."

The trend is catching on in the U.S. and elsewhere.

In Japan, plug-in bicycles are favored by cost-conscious companies and older commuters. "Many company workers are beginning to use them to visit clients instead of driving, to save fuel costs," says Miyuki Kimizuka of the Japan Bicycle Promotion Institute, a private industry group.

Australians use electric bicycles in rural towns without bus and train service. Tony Morgan, managing director of The Electric Bicycle Co. Pty. Ltd., the continent's largest manufacturer and retailer of e-bikes, says he has sold about 20,000 in the past decade, priced at 1,000-2,000 Australian dollars (about $800-$1,600).

In the Netherlands, an especially bicycle-friendly country, the industry says sales passed 138,800 last year.

In India, Vietnam and other developing countries, competition from motorcycles, as well as a lack of bike lanes and other infrastructure, are obstacles.

Indian sales have risen about 15 percent a year to 130,000 units, thanks in part to a 7,500 rupee ($150) government rebate that brings the cost down to about the cost of a conventional bicycle. But they are far outnumbered by the millions of new motorcycles taking to India's roadways.

In China, electric bikes sell for 1,700 yuan to 3,000 yuan ($250 to $450). They require no helmet, plates or driver's license, and they aren't affected by restrictions many cities impose on fuel-burning two-wheelers.

It costs a mere 1 yuan (15 U.S. cents) — about the same as the cheapest bus fare — to charge a bike for a day's use, says Guo Jianrong, head of the Shanghai Bicycle Association, an industry group.

They look like regular bicycles, only a bit heavier with the battery strapped on. Some can be pedaled; others run solely on battery. In China, their maximum weight is about 40 kilograms (90 pounds), and maximum legal speed is about 20 kph (12 mph).

"For us, these are tools for transportation," Guo said. "We're not like Americans and Europeans, who tend to bicycle for fun or exercise."

The e-bike doesn't emit greenhouse gases, though it uses electricity from power plants that do. The larger concern is the health hazards from production, recycling and disposal of lead-acid batteries.

Although China is beginning to turn out more electric bikes equipped with nickel-meter-hydride and lithium-ion batteries, 98 percent run on lead-acid types, says Guo.

A bike can use up to five of the batteries in its lifetime, according to Christopher Cherry, a professor at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville who researches the industry. A Chinese-made battery containing 10 kilograms (22 pounds) of lead can generate nearly 7 kilograms (about 15 pounds) of lead pollution, he says.

"Electric bikes result in far more emissions of lead than automobiles. They always use more batteries per mile than almost any other vehicle," Cherry said in a phone interview.

In China, owners are paid about 200 yuan ($30) to recycle old batteries but the work is often done in small, under-regulated workshops.

With price competition brutal among China's 2,300 electric bike and scooter makers, manufacturers have shied away from embracing costlier, cleaner technology. But bigger foreign sales and demand for better batteries may speed improvements.

"We are trying to upgrade to lithium battery technology to be able to sell internationally," said Hu Gang, a spokesman for Xinri E-Vehicle Group Co., the country's biggest e- bike manufacturer, with sales of more than 2 million units last year.

The goal is to boost production to more than 5 million units by 2013, he said.

"It's not that we're that ambitious," Hu said. "It's just that the industry is growing so quickly."

___
 

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Do I read from that the fact that if you are content to use lead-acid technology you can have a low cost transport solution but with limited performance and does not meet recycleability requirements for many countries, whereas if you go for more modern batteries you probably have the required performance and less of a recycleability problem (because they last longer, not because there is a solution!) but it might then be uneconomic.

40kg / 12 mph. But in reality they are rather faster!

There are some companies taking the Tesla concept to the motorcycle, coming up with expensive electric superbikes but for high prices, e.g. mission motorcycles whose bike is expected to go on sale for about 50k USD.
 

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What do the new regulations for ebakes mean for the ebike user?

For example, mine is over 40kg and goes over 30kph.

Because I am lau wai I am concerned. A colleague of mine was deported two years ago (after 7 days in jail) for riding an unregistered motorcycle.
 

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Hey man - sry to hear about your friend but where in the blue hell did that happen ? Wich province ? Usually they just take away the bike and you have to pay punishment but never get departed !!

Besides that Ebikes / EScooters are free from drivers licenses and mostly they dont even care if you have number plates on your bike !

I had unttil now 3 different types of ebikes and never regret it once. The only thing that i do different then chinese citizens is that i never drive without helmet.

Here in chengdu we have at least 7 till 8 million ebikes on the street and at least 50% without registration + at least 25 till 30 % motorcycles also without numbers and or registration!
Motorbikes are still a traffiuc tool for people from the countryside and the goverment closes usually both eyes as long as they stay away from the city centre area of capital cities.
Greetings

Logan ( German in Chengdu Sichuan Province China )
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
tigerbay said:
What do the new regulations for ebakes mean for the ebike user?

For example, mine is over 40kg and goes over 30kph.

Because I am lau wai I am concerned. A colleague of mine was deported two years ago (after 7 days in jail) for riding an unregistered motorcycle.
Nice to see another "lao wei" here! Tigerbay, what city are you in? I am really shocked to hear that a foreigner was deported for riding a unregistered motorcycle? I assume it was a gas bike? I can see in the biggest of cities having your e-bike taken away, but arrested and deported??:eek: Like logan here, I am also a e-bike rider (I think that's obvious, I started this thread), and I never had anything remotely like that happen to me. Right now there is a lot of confusion about the new regulations......first of all, they're not REALLY regulations yet. The intention was to begin enacting the new regs on Jan. 1 (2010), but there was such a huge outcry from people all over the country that Beijing is reconsidering things right now. Many, many businesses use e-bikes for deliveries, and many of the bikes are over the 40kg/30kph limit - attempting to strictly enforce the new regs would have been a disaster for local businesses all over the country. There is no doubt that this issue needs to be addressed - there are TOO many stupid and crazy e-bike riders out there that have NO IDEA WHATSOEVER about riding safely, paying attention to what is going on around you, things like that. Large e-bikes DO need to be regulated - they are just as fast, just as big and just as dangerous as a gas bike on a crowded city street, and it's asinine to see someone zipping along at 40-50kph, yapping away on their cel phone and wearing no helmet or paying attention at all. The way to do this would be to phase in the new regs over a 2-3 year period, and allow the masses to prepare for the new regs in a timely manner. First, require riders training. Maybe not a driver's license per se, but some kind of authorized safety training course. When you finish the course, you carry a card in your wallet to prove you have taken the course - and if not your e-bike is impounded. Second, required helmet laws for ALL e-bike riders (regardless of the size of the bike). This is a no-brainer, and a simple safety issue (not to mention a huge increase in business for helmet manufacturers in China....good for the economy). Third (and last), licensing and registration for the large e-bikes. This will make the riders/owners of the large e-bikes more accountable, much like traffic cameras right now taking pics of cars (and the license plates on them) that break traffic laws. This entire process should be phased in over a 3-4 year period, giving riders a chance to get used to each step along the way, and allowing the system to get the infrastructure in place to handle and distribute e-bike license plates.

It's great to have e-bikes here in China, they ARE practical and convenient. However, it's also time that e-bike riders start accepting more responsibility. If you want to have one of the large e-bikes that can keep up with the gas bikes, fine...........just learn how to ride it safely and responsibly. I'm fortunate - I used to ride a mid-size sport touring gas bike (Suzuki GS450) throughout most of the 1980's in America and I have the associated training and experience that goes along with riding a motorcycle. What about someone that has NO experience whatsoever, and yet is still able to walk into a shop right now and walk out with a e-bike that can go 60kph? That's a scary problem, and something needs to be done to make sure that the riders of these large e-bikes have SOME kind of training to ride them properly.
 
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