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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
140 killed in western China after Uighur riots and security crackdown

Jane Macartney, China Correspondent
One hundred and forty people have been killed and more than 800 wounded in riots that rocked the western China at the weekend, the deadliest social unrest since the Tiananmen Square crackdown.

Running battles raged through the city of Urumqi throughout Sunday, pitting members of the Uighur minority against ethnic Han Chinese. Witnesses said that up to 3,000 rioters went on the rampage, smashing buses and overturning police barricades during several hours of violence.

State television showed cars in flames in the streets, and others being over-turned by rioters. Other footage showed a number of men attacking a man, apparently a Han Chinese, who lay on the street bleeding from the head and from injuries to other parts of his body.

Burnt-out buses lay scattered on the streets of Urumqi, the capital of China's restive, westernmost region of Xinjiang.

The death toll from the day of violence was put at 140 by the Xinjiang police, who said 816 were injured. The numbers were announced by the state run Xinhua news agency in an unusually swift revelation of the extent of the violence.

Police said the number of dead was expected to rise. State television said at least one member of the paramilitary People's Armed Police had been killed.

Uighur exile groups said the violence started when Chinese security forces cracked down on the peaceful protest.

It was only after dark and following several hours of violence that the paramilitary police, equipped with tear gas and firing weapons, were able to restore order.

The violence flared days after reports of ethnic clashes between Han Chinese and Uighur workers at a toy factory in the southern Guangdong province in which two Uighurs were killed and 188 wounded.

It is uncertain what sparked the riots, but they may have broken out around the time of the popular Sunday bazaar when thousands of Uighurs converge in towns across the region to sell their sheep, goats and horses.

Police have arrested several hundred participants, including more than "10 key figures who fanned the unrest," Xinhua said. The security bureau said police were still searching for 90 key figures suspected of being behind the single worst day of violence since troops crushed student demonstrations centred on Tiananmen Square in June 1989.

It gave no details as to whether those involved were members of the Uighur minority or whether the violence had been triggered by long-standing ethnic tensions in Xinjiang.

"We are extremely saddened by the heavy-handed use of force by the Chinese security forces against the peaceful demonstrators," said Alim Seytoff, vice-president of the Washington-based Uighur American Association.

"We ask the international community to condemn China's killing of innocent Uighurs. This is a very dark day in the history of the Uighur people," he said.

Xinjiang has been shaken by several riots against Chinese rule over the last several decades, although the violence had appeared to abate since the late 1990s.

Control has been particularly tight in Urunqi where Han Chinese are now believed to out-number the Uighurs.

Last year, just days before the Olympic Games opened in Beijing, two young Uighurs ploughed a truck into a group of border police who were on a morning run near their barracks in the fabled Silk Road city of Kashgar, killing 17.

Those men were arrested and later executed.

State media said the latest riot was not a spontaneous outburst but was incited by a small group of people intent on stirring up trouble. It gave no other details.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
These are all human.nomather why they are being killed .:mad:

The majority of the people killed are the ethnic Uighurs.So what the hell is China trying to do by saying almost all the killed people are chinese han people and declining the numbers of deaths?

These are all humanbeings and China is responsible for everything bad happening in China.By hiding the truth and killing hundreds and thousands of people china has shown us once more that it is still the old China .:nono:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
156 killed, hundreds hurt as Uighurs clash with Chinese in Xinjiang

China’s Uighur problem boiled over on Sunday in a wave of violence that left at least 156 people dead and more than 800 people hurt in Xinjiang province’s capital of Urumqui.

State TV showed gruesome images of protesters attacking ethnic Chinese, kicking men and women on the ground and leaving them dazed and bloodied. Uighurs have accused the Chinese security forces of overreacting to peaceful demonstrations.

The Chinese authorities responded with a regionwide crackdown. On Monday in Xinjiang, police dispersed a group of 200 “rioters” gathered outside a mosque in Kashgar.

The State Department urged an end to the violence.

"We deeply regret the loss of life" in Urumqui, State Department spokesman Ian Kelly said. "We call on all sides for calm and restraint."

The Uighurs are a Muslim minority in China, but are the largest ethnic group in Xinjiang, an area about the size of Alaska. They constitute roughly half of the province’s 20 million inhabitants, but large numbers of Han Chinese have migrated to the capital of Urumqui, causing constant tension.

The Uighurs are separatists labeled by Beijing as terrorists. The Chinese government blamed the unrest on expatriate Rebiya Kadeer, head of the World Uyghur Congress now living in the U.S.

“Rebiya had phone conversations with people in China on July 5 in order to incite, and Web sites ... were used to orchestrate the incitement and spread propaganda,” Xinjiang Gov. Nur Bekri said on television early Monday.

The government successfully blocked or slowed all Internet access in the region to prevent protesters from organizing.

Xinjiang’s top Communist Party official, Wang Lequan, called the riots “a profound lesson learned in blood.”

“We must tear away Rebiya’s mask and let the world see her true nature,” Wang said.

Kadeer has denied fomenting unrest and has called for nonviolent protest.

Last month, a group of Uighurs who had been classified as enemy combatants were released from Guantanamo Bay and relocated to Bermuda.




http://www.nydailynews.com/news/us_...with_chinese_in_xinjiang.html#ixzz0Ka5RI1Xa&D


http://www.nydailynews.com/news/us_...with_chinese_in_xinjiang.html#ixzz0Ka52xhbn&D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Foreign Reporters Visit Prompts New Demonstration in Urumqi

Austin Ramzy, who is in Urumqi called to report that he is witnessing a new protest that is currently underway, apparently sparked by the presence of foreign reporters. He says that the Foreign Ministry and local government officials took six buses of reporters, about 50 in all, on a trip to see a burned out car dealership on Dawangnan Road. The reporters spoke to some victims and witnesses to Sunday's events for about half an hour. Then a Uighur woman with a small child (or two children; the situation is still confused) suddenly appeared and started complaining about her missing husband very loudly. Soon a crowd of around 30 Uighurs, mostly women in headscraves had gathered, many of them weeping, all complaining about their missing relatives: husbands, fathers, grandfathers, even one 14 year old boy, one mother told Austin. (The authorities say they have arrested some 1400 people).

Before long the crowd had swelled to several hundred and a group of riot police (members of the People's Armed Police) carrying shields and long truncheons and accompanied by several armoured personnel carriers began to try and clear the protesters. Some of the protesters sat down for a time. Most refused to move. That's where the situation stands now. All of this being witnessed by a crowd of reporters stuck more or less between the police and the protesters. A core group of some 75 women are refusing to move (many others have been hustled down sidestreets by police) and chanting slogans which bystanders tell Austin mostly are calling for the release of their husbands other male relatives.

Final update: most of the protesters have dispersed or been dispersed and Austin is being pretty much dragged away by his minders.

****

At one point, Austin says he was dragged down a side street by some of the women who wanted to show him something. They said the police swept through their neighborhood Monday and seem to have arrested any males. They said the men were forced to take off their shoes and trousers before being taken away and showed Austin a pile of some 60-70 pairs of shoes. He wonders whether the authorities may have been clearing the neighborhood for the visit by reporters, not figuring that the mass arrests would spark a reaction by the Uighur women.

(Something similar happened (without the presence of foreign reporters) in Hetian, a town in the far south of Xinjiang after the Lahsa protests in March of last year prompted mass arrests of males apparently aimed at heading of possible demonstrations. On the market day after the arrests hundreds of women protested, itself prompting and even greater clamp down.


http://china.blogs.time.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
After Deadly Riots, Ethnic Tensions Heat Up in Urumqi

Thousands of Han residents armed with clubs poured onto the streets of Urümqi Tuesday afternoon, raising the risk of further racial violence in this western Chinese city. Just two days ago, the Xinjiang capital was thrown into chaos when protests by more than 1,000 members of the Uighur minority turned into a riot. Sunday's events left 156 people dead and more than 1,000 injured, the deadliest outburst of public violence in China since People's Liberation Army soldiers killed several hundred people during the 1989 crackdown on demonstrators in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. The club-wielding Han groups said they were responding to the threat of further Uighur violence. Sunday's outburst targeted Han Chinese who make up 75% of Urumqi's population.


Earlier in the day, the Chinese government efforts at media management backfired dramatically, as a large group of women besieged an official tour of visiting journalists to protest the arrests of their husbands, sons and brothers. Six buses full of foreign and Chinese reporters were taken to a neighborhood southeast of Urumqi's Grand Bazaar to see an auto dealership that was burned by rioters Sunday.


As reporters interviewed residents of the area, a Uighur woman with two children stumbled past sobbing. The woman said she was bereft over the disappearance of her husband. Soon after, a dozen Uighur women emerged from a market, marching down a four-lane road and chanting slogans. The journalists and cameras followed, and soon the protesters — mostly women and children but some men as well — swelled to about 300 as Foreign Ministry minders stood aside, watching helplessly.

Several women said their family members had been detained in mass police arrests the previous day. "Free my husband! Free my husband!" a group of head-scarf-clad women cried. "He has heart disease," one woman said of her arrested husband. "He didn't go out yesterday or the day before, but still they took him." The women estimated that thousands of men had been arrested. They dumped out plastic bags that held more than 100 pairs of footwear and trousers, which they say police forced the detainees to take off when they were arrested. Urümqi Party Secretary Li Zhi had said earlier at a press conference that more than 1,000 people had been arrested, but that they were all taken while actively rioting.

As the women continued their protest in the road, they were met by several hundred military police carrying riot shields and truncheons. The police stood alongside four armored personnel carriers and attempted to push the demonstrators back. The protesters retreated then advanced on the military police, who eventually retreated about 100 yards as a group of black-clad riot police advanced from the other direction. After about an hour the protest faded down back alleys and Foreign Ministry officials pushed reporters back on buses. "It is hard for you to understand what it is like to be a Uighur," said a 25-year-old Uighur man named Musa, watching the women protest. "Uighur people can't get jobs."

The outburst punctured a tightly orchestrated effort to show the media the extent of the destruction wrought by the city's small Uighur community on Sunday. Reporters were given a CD that showed several minutes of footage of the mostly Uighur rioters attacking civilians and destroying property. Unlike the official response to the deadly unrest in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa last year, when the region was closed to outsiders for several months, journalists in Urümqi were given relatively free rein.

Before the women's march, the Xinjiang capital had been eerily quiet in the wake of Sunday's riots. Large groups of military police were stationed at key intersections on Monday, and only police vehicles, some of them with smashed windows, moved on the streets. Riot police stood outside the Hoi Tak Hotel as buses full of Hong Kong tourists were loaded in, their visit cut short by the unrest.

Sunday's Urümqi riot was triggered by unrest in the southern coastal province of Guangdong, where a disgruntled former factory worker started a rumor that a group of Uighur workers had raped two Han women. That touched off a riot on June 26 that left two Uighur workers dead. Police later arrested the man who started the rumor. This week's protest began as a peaceful demonstration by a group of about 1,000 Uighurs angered by the Guangdong riot. Witnesses said they shouted slogans in Uighur and Mandarin denouncing discrimination.

The Chinese government says the Xinjiang demonstrations and ensuing violence were provoked by Rebiya Kadeer, a Uighur activist and businesswoman who lives in exile in the U.S., and the World Uyghur Congress, the Munich-based exile group she heads. Kadeer was imprisoned for nearly six years in China on a national security-related conviction, a charge she says was politically motivated. The WUC denied this week that it had any role in the violence, and says that security forces used heavy-handed methods to confront demonstrators who were attempting to peacefully protest for equal rights under the law.

On Tuesday afternoon, hotel staff were seen taping up windows and businesses were locking their employees inside in fear of further violence. A 38-year-old Han man surnamed Fu who has lived in Xinjiang all his life said he was accustomed to the discord. "We're used to it already," he said, then pointed to a scar on his arm he says was the result of a fight with a Uighur man. "They're uncivilized."
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
After Deadly Riots, Ethnic Tensions Heat Up in Urumqi

Thousands of Han residents armed with clubs poured onto the streets of Urümqi Tuesday afternoon, raising the risk of further racial violence in this western Chinese city. Just two days ago, the Xinjiang capital was thrown into chaos when protests by more than 1,000 members of the Uighur minority turned into a riot. Sunday's events left 156 people dead and more than 1,000 injured, the deadliest outburst of public violence in China since People's Liberation Army soldiers killed several hundred people during the 1989 crackdown on demonstrators in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. The club-wielding Han groups said they were responding to the threat of further Uighur violence. Sunday's outburst targeted Han Chinese who make up 75% of Urumqi's population.


Earlier in the day, the Chinese government efforts at media management backfired dramatically, as a large group of women besieged an official tour of visiting journalists to protest the arrests of their husbands, sons and brothers. Six buses full of foreign and Chinese reporters were taken to a neighborhood southeast of Urumqi's Grand Bazaar to see an auto dealership that was burned by rioters Sunday.


As reporters interviewed residents of the area, a Uighur woman with two children stumbled past sobbing. The woman said she was bereft over the disappearance of her husband. Soon after, a dozen Uighur women emerged from a market, marching down a four-lane road and chanting slogans. The journalists and cameras followed, and soon the protesters — mostly women and children but some men as well — swelled to about 300 as Foreign Ministry minders stood aside, watching helplessly.

Several women said their family members had been detained in mass police arrests the previous day. "Free my husband! Free my husband!" a group of head-scarf-clad women cried. "He has heart disease," one woman said of her arrested husband. "He didn't go out yesterday or the day before, but still they took him." The women estimated that thousands of men had been arrested. They dumped out plastic bags that held more than 100 pairs of footwear and trousers, which they say police forced the detainees to take off when they were arrested. Urümqi Party Secretary Li Zhi had said earlier at a press conference that more than 1,000 people had been arrested, but that they were all taken while actively rioting.

As the women continued their protest in the road, they were met by several hundred military police carrying riot shields and truncheons. The police stood alongside four armored personnel carriers and attempted to push the demonstrators back. The protesters retreated then advanced on the military police, who eventually retreated about 100 yards as a group of black-clad riot police advanced from the other direction. After about an hour the protest faded down back alleys and Foreign Ministry officials pushed reporters back on buses. "It is hard for you to understand what it is like to be a Uighur," said a 25-year-old Uighur man named Musa, watching the women protest. "Uighur people can't get jobs."

The outburst punctured a tightly orchestrated effort to show the media the extent of the destruction wrought by the city's small Uighur community on Sunday. Reporters were given a CD that showed several minutes of footage of the mostly Uighur rioters attacking civilians and destroying property. Unlike the official response to the deadly unrest in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa last year, when the region was closed to outsiders for several months, journalists in Urümqi were given relatively free rein.

Before the women's march, the Xinjiang capital had been eerily quiet in the wake of Sunday's riots. Large groups of military police were stationed at key intersections on Monday, and only police vehicles, some of them with smashed windows, moved on the streets. Riot police stood outside the Hoi Tak Hotel as buses full of Hong Kong tourists were loaded in, their visit cut short by the unrest.

Sunday's Urümqi riot was triggered by unrest in the southern coastal province of Guangdong, where a disgruntled former factory worker started a rumor that a group of Uighur workers had raped two Han women. That touched off a riot on June 26 that left two Uighur workers dead. Police later arrested the man who started the rumor. This week's protest began as a peaceful demonstration by a group of about 1,000 Uighurs angered by the Guangdong riot. Witnesses said they shouted slogans in Uighur and Mandarin denouncing discrimination.

The Chinese government says the Xinjiang demonstrations and ensuing violence were provoked by Rebiya Kadeer, a Uighur activist and businesswoman who lives in exile in the U.S., and the World Uyghur Congress, the Munich-based exile group she heads. Kadeer was imprisoned for nearly six years in China on a national security-related conviction, a charge she says was politically motivated. The WUC denied this week that it had any role in the violence, and says that security forces used heavy-handed methods to confront demonstrators who were attempting to peacefully protest for equal rights under the law.

On Tuesday afternoon, hotel staff were seen taping up windows and businesses were locking their employees inside in fear of further violence. A 38-year-old Han man surnamed Fu who has lived in Xinjiang all his life said he was accustomed to the discord. "We're used to it already," he said, then pointed to a scar on his arm he says was the result of a fight with a Uighur man. "They're uncivilized."

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1908969,00.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
About 1400 men including 14 year old boys:mad: are sent to prisons after the latest clashes.below are the latest photos which show us the brutal Chinese military response to Uighur women who ask for their husbands or sons to be sent home from prison.
Look at the Chinese han people with the Chinese police running on the streets to find and kill the enemy:mad:
The civilization in Urumqi needs urgent help.However the world is just keeping too calm uninterested to these kilings.the dead tolls are estimated to be more than 1000 not only 156 or so.remember last year in Tibet a Chinese correspondent said there were nobody killed or injured in Tibet riots in march2008 to the BBc journalist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Bloodthirsty mobs strike back against Uighurs in Xinjiang


http://www.nydailynews.com/news/us_...eft_156_dead_in_xinjiang.html#ixzz0KfViWzSA&D


Vengeance-seeking Han Chinese struck back against minority Muslim Uighurs in China's Xinjiang province on Tuesday as anger and panic ruled the capital of Urumqui.

Two days after violent clashes between the ethnic groups left 156 dead and more than 1,000 injured, thousands of Han Chinese roamed the streets armed with such improvised weapons as meat cleavers, hammers, chains and steel poles.

"They attacked us. Now it’s our turn to attack them," a Han man in the crowd told Reuters.

Police used tear gas to disperse mobs of youths chanting "Defend the Country" while trying to get to a Uighur neighborhood. Uighurs attacked Han Chinese near the Urumqui railroad station while women protested the arrest of up to a 1,000 Uighur men.

Han Chinese neighborhoods were gripped with fear as people desperately sought out lumber or shovels to
defend themselves and bought bottled water out of concern "the Uighurs might poison the water," as one resident told the Associated Press.

The continued violence and reprisals may have been worsened by Beijing's attempt to control the message.
The government had blocked or slowed down Web traffic in the region to prevent users on sites such as Twitter and YouTube from broadcasting images and stories to the world.

The state-controlled media had mostly images and clips of Uighurs attacking Han Chinese, sparking outrage among the country's ethnic majority.



http://www.nydailynews.com/news/us_...eft_156_dead_in_xinjiang.html#ixzz0KfW36hUy&D
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
China vows harsh measures to end violence in Xinjiang province


China vowed to use execute those responsible for violence in the province of Xinjiang while foreign leaders called for restraint. Clashes in the troubled region between Muslim Uighurs and Han Chinese over the past several days have left at least 156 dead, more than 1,000 injured and 1,400 arrested.

The situation forced President Hu Jintao to abrutly end his trip to Italy for the G8 summit, a stunning embarrassment for the Chinese leader.

Troops in riot gear were an ominous presence in the streets of Urumqui, the epicenter of the ethnic clashes.

Communist Party chief Li Zhi told a televised news conference that many people had been arrested, including students.
“To those who committed crimes with cruel means, we will execute them,” he said.

The turmoil began on Sunday as Uighurs protested the deaths of Uighur factory workers in the southern city of Shaoguan. It is not clear how the incident got out of hand, but the state-controlled media repeatedly showed images of injured and bleeding Han Chinese, an ethnic majority of the country's 1.3 billion people.

The media reports likely fueled anger and bloodthirsty mobs of angry Han Chinese roamed the streets with makeshift weapons in search of vengeance.

The Uighurs are a Turkic people and the prime minister of Turkey, Tayyip Erdogan, called for Beijing to show restraint and said he will ask the UN Security Council to address the problem.

"We expect a swift end to the events amounting to atrocity, the prevalence of common sense... and the immediate implementation of the necessary measures in line with universal human rights," Erdogan said.

The official line from Beijing is that expatriate Uighur leader Rebiya Kadeer and her of inciting violence. Kadeer, who lives in the U.S., denies the claim and says she wants to use nonviolence means to call attention to the plight of China's Uighurs.

The Dalai Lama said he was "deeply saddened and concerned" with the situation in Xinjiang. "I earnestly urge the Chinese authorities to exercise restraint in dealing with the situation in a spirit of understanding and far-sightedness," the Tibetan leader said.



http://www.nydailynews.com/news/us_...ina_vows_harsh_measures_.html#ixzz0Kmq088VG&D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A Brief History of
The Uighurs





The violence that has claimed at least 156 lives in the western Chinese region of Xinjiang this week is rooted in long-standing grievances among China's Uighur minority. The Turkic-speaking Muslim Uighurs were traditionally the dominant ethnic group in the region whose Mandarin name, Xinjiang, means simply "New Frontier" — perhaps a reflection of the fact that the region was only brought under Beijing's control in its entirety during the 19th century rein of the Qing dynasty. And this week they have found themselves in violent confrontation with Han Chinese, who have become a significant majority in the capital, Urumqi, thanks to Beijing's settlement policies.


Despite an official ideology that recognized them as equal citizens of the communist state, Uighurs have always had an uncomfortable relationship with the authorities in Beijing. In 1933, amid the turbulence of China's civil wars, Uighur leaders in the ancient Silk Road city of Kashgar declared a short-lived independent Republic of East Turkestan. But Xinjiang was wholly subsumed into the new state forged by China's victorious Communists after 1949, with Beijing steadily tightening its grip on the oil rich territory. Its official designation as an "autonomous region" belies rigid controls from the central government over Xinjiang, and a policy of settling hundreds of thousands of Han Chinese there that has left the Uighurs comprising a little less than half of the region's roughly 20 million people.
(See pictures of the race riots in China.)


The Uighurs have deep roots in the region, descending from the ancient Sogdian traders once observed by Marco Polo. Unlike many of the nomadic tribes of Central Asia, the Uighurs are an urban people whose identity crystallized in the oasis towns of the Silk Road. A walk through the bazaars of old Uighur centers such as Kashgar, Khotan or Yarkhand reveals the physical legacy of a people rooted along the first trans-contintental trade route: an astonishing array of hazel and even blue eyes, with blonde or brown or black hair — typically tucked beneath headscarves or the customary Uighur felt cap.

Its cosmopolitan setting also gave the Uighurs' homeland a rich mix of religious and cultural traditions. Xinjiang is the home to some of China's oldest Buddhist temples and most celebrated monks, while Islam arrived in the tenth century and became dominant in the subsequent centuries. Most Uighurs today practice a brand of Islam that is peaceful and tolerant and mixed with the mystical strains of Sufism. One of their holiest sites is the tomb of an 18th century concubine who, according to legend, naturally exuded an overwhelming and intoxicating musk.
(Read "Palau: Next Stop After Gitmo?")


The discovery of dozens of Uighurs at guerrilla camps in Afghanistan after the U.S. invasion of 2001 highlighted the fact that some have, in recent years, been lured by a more fundamentalist form of Islam. Many analysts believe this development has been a reaction to the strict controls imposed by the communist authorities who have restricted religious freedoms: The numbers of Uighurs permitted to make the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca has been limited; Uighur government employees are forbidden from fasting during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan; the political authorities appoint the Imams at every mosque, and often dictate the sermons preached during Friday prayers.

Curbs on religious freedom have been accompanied by cultural restrictions. The Uighur language, written in Arabic script, has been steadily phased out of higher education, having been once deemed by Xinjiang's Communist leader to be unsuitable for China's "scientific development." Uighurs in Xinjiang are often denied the right to travel outside of China, or even within it. Those who do manage to move to China's major cities eke out a desperate living as migrant workers, often viewed with distrust and suspicion by the larger Chinese population. The immediate cause of Sunday's protest in Urumqi appears to have been a mass attack on a community of Uighur laborers in a southern Chinese factory town thousands of miles away from Xinjiang.

Widespread Uighur alienation has prompted some to resort to violence. Following the 9/11 attacks in the U.S., Beijing convinced Washington to list the little-known East Turkestan Islamic Movement (ETIM) as a terrorist organization. Some Uighurs were captured by coalition forces in Afghanistan and sent to Guantánamo, but many have subsequently been released. The specter of Uighur terrorism loomed over Xinjiang after a series of attacks and bombings hit the province during the build-up to last year's Beijing Olympics. The extent of the ETIM's tactical capabilities and its connections to other more prominent terrorist outfits remains unclear. Other exiled Uighur movements are avowedly secular, such as the World Uyghur Congress led by Rebiya Kadeer, accused by Beijing of fomenting the recent riots.

Beijing casts its own role in Xinjiang as that of a benevolent force for progress, citing the economic development spurred by its billions of dollars of investment. To be sure, Urumqi is now a city of skyscrapers, but its population is almost 75% Han Chinese, and the Uighurs claim they're frozen out of jobs — and see themselves as the victims of China's own westward expansion.

China's approach to the region is captured in a recent plan to bulldoze much of Kashgar's historic Old City — an atmospheric, millennia-old warren of mosques and elaborate mud-brick houses — and replace it with a tourist-oriented theme park version, resettling its Uighur population (who were not consulted) in "modern" housing miles away from the city.

But the events in Urumqi seem to suggest that as long as Uighurs feel helpless in the face of what they see as encroachment by an often-hostile culture, the potential remains high for new outbreaks of violence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Death toll in China's Xinjian province rises to 184

The Associated Press

Friday, July 10th 2009, 1:07 PM




URUMQUI, China — Chinese officials provided the first ethnic breakdown of the deaths in the
fighting between Muslima Uighurs and Han Chinese in the Xinjiang province.

The official Xinhua News Agency reported that 137 of the victims belonged to the dominant Han Chinese ethnic group. The Han victims included 111 men and 26 women, the report said.

The rest of the deaths were 45 men and one woman who were Uighurs along with one man
of the Hui ethnic group, Xinhua said, citing the information office of the regional government. The report said the total death toll rose from 156 to 184.

Boisterous crowds turned up at mosques in riot-hit parts of the city, ignoring orders canceling Friday prayers due to the ethnic violence, and police quickly broke up a small protest nearby.

About 100 men argued with guards, demanding they be let in for prayers at the White Mosque — near the Muslim Uighur neighborhood that saw some of the worst violence after angry protests Sunday spiraled into a riot.

A Uighur policeman guarding the mosque, who would not give his name, said: “We decided to open the mosque because so many people had gathered. We did not want an incident.”

Officials in the city of Kashgar, an historic Uighur cultural and commercial center near Xinjiang’s border with Pakistan, declared the city off-limits to reporters in all but name. Foreign reporters were not allowed to leave their hotels, except to travel to the airport. An Associated Press photographer was detained repeatedly and escorted to the airport.

The effect was to make it impossible for reporters to work.

“There are no conditions for interviews in Kashgar, so we hope the foreign reporters will leave for their own safety,” said Chen Li, a media officer with the city government.

Nearby, on Liberation Road, a group of about 40 Uighur men and women began to march, shouting, crying and pumping their fists in the air as they walked.

Madina Ahtam, a woman in a multicolored headscarf, begged foreign reporters to stay with them as they walked.

“Every Uighur people are afraid,” she said in English. “Do you understand? We are afraid. ... The problem? Police.”

A group of 10 police in bulletproof vests and helmets and armed with batons and stun guns blocked their march within minutes. Shortly after, several dozen more police surrounded the group and forced them to squat on the sidewalk. Police pushed journalists away from the area and detained at least four foreign journalists, holding them for several hours.

Kaishar, a 23-year-old car salesman, said his heart hurt when he first saw that the gates to the mosque were closed.

“There was no reason to shut the gate. They said it was for our safety but actually there is no need; nothing will happen here,” said Kaishar, with a red prayer mat folded under his arm.

It was not known how many of the mosques across the city of 2.3 million people were opened.

A few blocks from the White Mosque, at the Yang Hang mosque, hundreds of men streamed in clutching green, red and blue prayer mats. A white notice that had been glued to the front gate canceling the day’s service was gone.

The government has imposed curfews and flooded the streets with security forces to avoid a repeat of the running street battles earlier in the week.



http://www.nydailynews.com/news/us_...uighurs_live_in_fear_in_.html#ixzz0KtIp9UW9&D
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
chinese officials at last accepted that the death toll rised, but just to 184! if you believe.
We all know that if China says 1 dead it is at least 10 .China is doing very bad by restricting the media's job there,they don't even let the journalists do their job.İnternet connection in xinjang is off.telephone,cell phones are unable to contact the outer world.And the chaos is still there.
By telling lies(most of the deaths are han chinese lies) does china really think that she can handle this situation and overcome with it?
those who escaped have already been sending the videos taken with their cell phones to the internet now and it is heartbreaking.A crowd of mobs are second by second killing two uighur men ,by throwing huge stones to their heads while one is stepping on the poor mans head,another chinese is throwing big stones and breaking his bones.And at last they lay there,death.
I can't print the link here because I don't think it is right to do so,but I beg the Chinese please tell the truth.how many uighurs have you killed(mass murdered)and please,please stop all this.What will you do if tomorrow the 35 million of the whole uighur population gathers on the streets to protest you, will you kill them all?

How do you think the world will believe you that nearly all the deaths are han chinese?ıs china such a tolerant modern democrasy and since when?even on the first day the chinese have killed more than 400 innocent people and arrested 1400.What about the second day and the third day and yesterday?You don't let the uighurs go out of their houses but han chinese mobs in crowds of hundreds,or even thousands come together in the streets and attack the poor civilians houses and seek for rage and kill every single uighur they find anywhere?the death toll is at least a few thousand and those who are arrested are about 6000.NONE OF THEM ARE HAN CHİNESE.How can it be that the chinese can't arrest any hans but on the other hand announce that those who are found guilty will be executed with death penalty?Where are the humanrights?

I once was a Chinese car fan but it's over now.You have lost my support for your goods.after all these horrible scenes I can't forgive if China doesn't behave humanly against their ethnicities no matter whether tibetans or uighurs,they are just humanbeings.

sorry for disturbing you all but I can't stand it anymore.You will never see any posts from me from now on.China should learn how to threat people.İf she can then comes the learning to produce good products, cars etc.
 

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eddie I don't really understand why you have to twist the REAL truth around to further your propaganda, the MAJORITY victims were HAN, stop twisting the truth around.


Proof:
www(.)youtube(DOT)com/watch?v=z61RbRJFJPw
www(.)youtube(.)com/watch?v=a_qGIl4gF1M


Note: they are UYGHURS mobs

edited by martin_krpan: Please watch your language and keep the discussion civilized!
 

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Eddie, were you a Chinese car fan because you love cars or are you applying to the car what people will do. I have always admired the cars of different countries even if I didn't agree with the nation's politics. All nations have some questionable things going on. I don't care if you are Chinese, American, European, or from anywhere else, this forum is about the interest in cars. I'm here because we don't see Chinese cars here in the US, even though some motor scooter are sold here.
 
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