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Welcome to 2005. Population: YOU.

NAC-MG's "Modern Gentleman" wordmark has been circulating since their first trade show in China shortly after the takeover.
 

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Why?

Are you wishing them success all of a sudden?
 

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Seamaster said:
Welcome to 2005. Population: YOU.

NAC-MG's "Modern Gentleman" wordmark has been circulating since their first trade show in China shortly after the takeover.
It was 2006 actually, 28th May at the Nanjing International Exhibition Centre:



but it in no way changes the meaning of MG, it is just a marketing slogan similar to "Safety Fast" and "Lifes too short not to" and is derived from the sound of "Emm Gee" when spoken in Chinese.

MG is still MG


Edit: (It's good to see that 4*real*made_in_china and Puppetland are so concerend about it though!)
 

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Seamaster said:
Why?

Are you wishing them success all of a sudden?
I wish Nanjing every success with their MG range - never said otherwise.

However, I do not underestimate the gigantic (some would say Herculean) task ahead of them, especially here in the UK. If they use the 'Modern Gentlemen' line in any advertising copy it will surely alienate potential female buyers - and with the MG TF being quite a girly car - you don't want that.
 

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NAC are the new owners, they're entitled to do what they want. In a capitalist society I am always reminded by an American colleague that sentiment has no place. You do what's necessary to make a profit. If that means re-branding, so be it. The few enthusiasts feeling left out are of little concern to the potentially new market.

From one of the articles doing the rounds currently:
MG’s new Chinese owner, Nanjing Automobile Group, has decided to change the meaning of the famous initials to help promote the brand in its new home. MG originally stood for Morris Garages but Nanjing’s Zhang Xin has commented that the firm “wants Chinese consumers to know this brand as Modern Gentleman, to see that this brand represents grace and style.”
China has only just come into the automotive market in relative terms compared to the history of many European brands - any heritage relating to Abingdon, Kimber or Morris etc is of little issue to the average Chinese buyer at which the majority of the non-sportscar production will be targetted (remember they will be building saloons/hatchbacks for the Chinese market). As with SAIC that hoped to get the Rover name (Rover cars, not Land Rover), NAC wanted to get a brand that had European roots that they could build on and distance themselves from local Chinese brand names, thus appealing to a more affluent buyer. It does state that NAC intend to brand it as the Modern Gentleman in the Chinese market.

And as the majority buyer in China is likely to still be a male, sexism and Modern Gentlemen is probably of little concern as much as it is in the Western markets.

The latest news is that NAC are looking for an advertising agency here in Europe to help re-launch the TF sportscar which suggests that they at least understand the need to maintain the heritage in this market, and have been working very closely with the likes of the MGOC (specifically Roger Parker) to ensure that they market it right here.

Of course, the other news is that there appears to be a dispute between the Chinese and the Americans that have been over here at Longbridge over the Chinese approach to business. The Ardmore facility is in question at the moment, once again highlighting that the ways of the West are very different to those of the Chinese.

And a final point, according to Cecil Kimber's daughter and John Thornley, MG never stood for Morris Garages. It is true to surmise that as a result of Morris Garages of Oxford being the base for the sporting specials that eventually became production MG cars, this is the case. But according to the insiders, MG always stood for itself, just MG, and nothing more!
 

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I'm sure you share my amusement, Martin, that those who bleat the loudest about affronts to MG's "heritage" are almost without exception those who know the least about it.
 

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whats the point of changing names which will make little or no difference at all in this case because the will still be MG. instead efforts should be directed at changing designs and looks so the cars have thier own character and not be a copy look
 

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>>> is derived from the sound of "Emm Gee" when spoken in Chinese.

Windy, what would the characters be for the emm gee sound? I've been thinking about it all day and cant get it right.
 

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well the fat cats at the manufacturer need to sort out other important things instead of dwadling with the name
 

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chinacartimes said:
>>> is derived from the sound of "Emm Gee" when spoken in Chinese.

Windy, what would the characters be for the emm gee sound? I've been thinking about it all day and cant get it right.
The characters they have chosen to represent "MG" are of course "名爵" pronounced "míng jué".

There is a good explanation in the comments section of that Autoblog article which says much the same as I remember Zhang Xin of NAC saying when he originaly introduced "Modern Gentleman" in May 2006.


Explanation copied from Autoblog:
15. "Modern Gentleman" is the Chinese brandname of MG translated back in English.

The Chinese population needs a Chinese brandname to refer to just as an English speaking person couldn't refer to a Chinese brand written in Chinese.

Chinese can't refer "MG" as "MG" because they don't use alphabet in the language. They have to uses Chinese words that sounds like "Em-Gee", instead of using meaningless Chinese words that sounds like "Em-Gee", the guys from Nanjing chose an arrangement of Chinese words that means "Famous Gentleman". This name is referred as "Modern Gentleman" in English because it can be shorten to MG (and not FG).

There are only so many combination of meaningful Chinese words that sounds something like "Em-Gee".

I hope this will clear things up, and possibly be included in the article.
The reason for this "Modern Gentleman" name is behind languages, not because Nanjing is ignorant of MG's heritage.
Posted at 2:59PM on Jan 11th 2007 by Andy 0 stars

 

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The real explanation certainly shows up the xenophobic philistinism of planks like Muppetman.
 

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It's amusing to see when someone can no longer fight their corner - they always have to turn to personal insults. :rolleyes:

And the Top Gear article was absolutely correct.

Liked the bit about: "oil leak-prone, name." Very apt!
 

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Windy said:
The characters they have chosen to represent "MG" are of course "名爵" pronounced "míng jué".
Oh bugger - now I get it. I was trying to put the English phonetic sound into Chinese, thinking of something like 现代男.

名爵 is more famous noble I guess rather than modern man.

Chinese cars and their names. Drives me nuts.:nod:
 

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xiàn dài nán - No, doesn't sound much like "MG" :lol:

Google translate prefers "Lord" to "noble", but "Lord", "noble" and "Gentleman" all have similar meaning - well sort of. Maybe it depends on what part of China you come from?

Anyway, they had to have some way of writing "MG" in characters that the Chinese could read and I haven't seen a better solution.

As for destroying MGs history, they seem very keen to keep all its heritage, in fact I see mention of them setting up a museum full of MG history; Top Gear is entirely wrong.

(Edit: special exhibition center: http://www.zsnews.cn/Automobile/2007/01/08/618489.shtml )
 

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Puppetland said:
It's amusing to see when someone can no longer fight their corner - they always have to turn to personal insults.
You long since lost the scrap, Muppetman, years since, when you could no longer disguise your total ignorance of the subject.

Talk about a battle of wills with an unarmed man.
 
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